• 17th July 2017 - By greg

    I calculated the total cost of factors that decreased my average speed to be worth about .335 kph This is to say, that my actual 10.18 kph ave speed estimation for 24 hours based on Thursdays record run on Glenmore reservoir *could* be as high as (10.18 + .335 = 10.515 kph) without the impediment of these costs. The factors that caused my average speed to drop below my optimal estimate are:

    1. Counting surveyed laps rather than actual distance travelled as measured by GPS (.17 kph)
    2. Pausing to clear weeds off prop and rudder (.05 kph)
    3. Slow re-supply pitstops (.1 kph)
    4. Slowing down to turn the tight turn-arounds at both ends of my course (.015 kph)

    My distance in 24 hours could be as high as 252.36 lm (10.515 * 24) which would beat both my record, and Carters kayak record. However, to be fair, Carter had to count surveyed laps on his record so it would not be a fair comparison.

    I am pretty much convinced that the Glenmore reservoir is the ideal course due to the rowing lane location between 2 hills that tend to block the prevailing winds. That being the case, I would go for another record attempt on Glenmore reservoir if the city were to agree to permission again, and, most importantly, if Guinness agrees to my rule change recommendations which would allow me to use a GPS to measure distance travelled, and to not have to conform to a rigid buoy marked course. If I can get these 2 check boxes checked, then this is what my ideal Glenmore course might look like (Blue is my track from Thursday, RED is the ideal route):

    Glenmore Reservoir Idea route

     

    Following is how I derived these estimated average speeds and costs:

    Since I had some technical issues that occurred at just after 10 hours into the 24 hour record attempt on Thursday last week, I’ll use the first 10 hours to establish what I could expect as an average speed for this attempt, and what various speed impediments actually cost me. Then, I’ll design an “ideal” 24 hour record scenario, and estimate my average speed once all of the impediments are eliminated – or at least, mitigated.

    As per my log counting the laps multiplied by the surveyed distance around each lap, my average was 10.36 kph after 10 hours. This includes bathroom stops, longer than planned resupply pit stops, stops to de-weed my prop and rudder, slowing down to round the tight corners, water surface conditions that were a mix of some wind, some small waves, and calm (generally very good water conditions), and of course, pedaling a larger circumference required to clear the buoys around my surveyed course.

    I will estimate that I can hold an average of 10.36 for 12 hours, then to be conservative, I will estimate being able to hold 10.0 kph average speed for the last 12 hours equalling a potential overall average of 10.18 kph over 24 hours. This is what I ‘would have’ travelled if not for the break down, and eventual quit after 16 hours.

    Analysis of the “speed costs”

    As per my actual GPS average speed, my average was 10.5 kph after 10 hours. This includes bathroom stops, longer than planned resupply pit stops, stops to de-weed my prop and rudder, and a mix of some wind, some small waves, and calm (generally very good water conditions).

    The actual distance covered according to counting the surveyed laps resulted in only 10.36 kph, a difference of .14 kph which is the ‘cost’ of pedaling a bigger circumference around the surveyed buoy marked course.

    Another way to calculate this circumference cost is:
    length of my surveyed course = 3.264 km
    length of a typical actual loop using GPS data = 3.32 km
    Cost for counting surveyed laps = .056 km, or 1.7% which equates to an ave speed difference of .17  (I’ll use .14 because there was more data)

    Typical hour without resupply slow-down = 10.8 kph
    That same hour including resupply slow down = 10.7 kph

    Cleaning weeds off of rudder and prop happened on average about once per 2 hours, and took about the same amount of time as a resupply, so I’ll estimate a .05 kph ave speed cost for that

    Ave speed going around tight corners at both ends of the course = 10.7 kph
    Ave speed on straight section = 10.8
    Since corner turns are about 15% of my entire course, I estimate that turning the corners cost .015 kph overall

    COSTS:

    1. Resupply pit stops = .1 kph
    2. Counting laps = .17 kph
    3. Cleaning weeds = .05 kph
    4. Rounding tight corners = .015 kph

    Total costs = .335 kph This is to say, that my actual 10.18 kph ave speed estimation for 24 hours could be as high as (10.18 + .335 = 10.515 kph) without impediment of these “costs”. If I was allowed to use actual distance travelled as measured by my GPS rather than counting surveyed laps, if I used my weed shedding rudder and avoided having to stop to clear weeds, if I rehearsed pitstop procedures, and made them more efficient costing me no lost time, and if I did not have to turn tight corners around buoys, then My distance in 24 hours could be as high as 252.36 lm (10.515 * 24) which would beat both my record, and Carters kayak record. however, to be fair, Carter had to count surveyed laps on his record so it would not be a fair comparison.

     

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